Tagged with nginx

Tumblr Architecture Overview

Tumblr Architecture Overview

Tumblr Architecture – 15 Billion Page Views a Month and Harder to Scale than Twitter With over 15 billion page views a month Tumblr has become an insanely popular blogging platform. Users may like Tumblr for its simplicity, its beauty, its strong focus on user experience, or its friendly and engaged community, but like it they … Continue reading

Pixable Architecture Overview

Pixable Architecture Overview

 Crawling, Analyzing, and Ranking 20 Million Photos a Day Pixable aggregates photos from across your different social networks and finds the best ones so you never miss an important moment. That means currently processing the metadata of more than 20 million new photos per day: crawling, analyzing, ranking, and sorting them along with the other … Continue reading

The Pintrest stack – Architectual overview

The Pintrest stack – Architectual overview

A Short on the Pinterest Stack for Handling 3+ Million Users Pinterest co-founder Paul Sciarra shared a bit about their stack on Quora: Python + heavily-modified Django at the application layer Tornado and (very selectively) node.js as web-servers. Memcached and membase / redis for object- and logical-caching, respectively. RabbitMQ as a message queue. Nginx, HAproxy and … Continue reading

WordPress.com web server architecture

WordPress.com web server architecture

WordPress.com Serves 70,000 req/sec and over 15 Gbit/sec of Traffic using NGINX This is a guest post by Barry Abrahamson, Chief Systems Wrangler at Automattic, and Nginx’s Coufounder Andrew Alexeev. WordPress.com serves more than 33 million sites attracting over 339 million people and 3.4 billion pages each month. Since April 2008, WordPress.com has experienced about 4.4 times growth in page views. WordPress.com … Continue reading

Trip Advisor Infrastructure design

Trip Advisor Infrastructure design

It’s been a little over a year since our last post about the TripAdvisor architecture. It has been an exciting year. Our business and team continues to grow, we are now an independent public company, and we have continued to keep/scale our development process and culture as we have grown – we still run dozens of … Continue reading